Cultivating  Energy  Practices

To have a healthy body, you have to practice a happy spirit.

During workshops and retreats we will combine, along with yoga asanas, gentle somatic work in movement, together with healing practices, in rest . There will be an introduction to energizing body massage, an introduction to Body Weather Laboratory within a trustful environment. We will explore different breathing techniques. The sessions will be practiced in a group, working alone and working with a partner.  The sessions can be suitable for practice in studio as well as in nature.

Holistic approach to body-mind practice conceives the body as "a force of nature: omni-centered, anti-hierarchic, and acutely sensitive to external stimuli". (Min tanaka)

The work focuses on the skeletal structure, joint articulation, ease of muscular tension, deep tissue awareness, and the use of gravity and momentum to facilitate movement.

The practice goes beyond the linear flow of Asanas in Yoga (Vinyasa, Ashtanga) as it challenges also the centers in our body, getting out of balance, working with orientation and disorientation - all having a direct impact on our sensorial perception.

Here we embody how to cope when we feel not in our center and how to utilize this feeling/sensation for leverage. We learn to see with our ears, to listen with our eyes, and to sense the present with the 3rd eye.

Impact on yoga in nature

Once this somatic and spatial awareness practices are developed the impact of practicing yoga in nature is higher.

Body -mind  workshops

“Dealing with suffering is like handling a poisonous snake. We have to learn about the snake, and we ourselves have to grow stronger and more stable in order to handle it without hurting ourselves. At the end of this process, we will be ready to confront the snake. If we never confront it, one day it will surprise us and we will die of a snake bite. The pain we carry in the deep levels of our consciousness is similar. When it grows big and confronts us, there’s nothing we can do if we haven’t practiced becoming strong and stable in mindfulness. We should only invite our suffering up when we’re ready. Then, when it comes we can handle it. To transform our suffering, we don’t struggle with it or try to get rid of it. We simply bathe it in the light of our mindfulness.” — Thich Nhat Hanh, Reconciliation: Healing the Inner Child.

Inner Child practices